Posts Tagged Literature

My review of 2666 by Roberto Bolaño…

Recently I read this novel and I must say that there’s allot of death in this tale (or collection of random tales) so if you don’t like reading about death and rape and killings and guns, with some occasional obscene words, don’t read 2666 unless you either crave a sort of first time for this […]

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as man and superman, beyond tragedy…

In 1872 philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche published his first title ‘The Birth of Tragedy’ the theme of which was the classical Athenian tragedy art form, you can read more about it here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Birth_of_Tragedy This is my poetic review of this work… as man and superman, beyond tragedy as a superhuman thing entering me at the turn […]

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lost in the garden…

The following contains absolutely no adventure, there is purpose but no goal, and no transparency was required. The following is only a representation of me recently completing the reading of the book ‘The Garden of Forking Paths’ by Jorge Luis Borges… In writing this intro I also happen to be utilising the prompts, adventure, goal […]

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devouring mystery…

This writer loves reading diverse literature, it stimulates the mental construct and presents many an ingredient for writing. For those who follow/view the blog on the website (not the reader), you will realise that I have my Goodreads widget up that displays the books I’m currently reading. We’ll I’ve decided to occasionally post a piece […]

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How mastering this will make your writing compelling and authoritative…

English professor and author Joe Moran of Liverpool John Moores University, UK, presents a brief discourse on a rather simple writing skill we should all develop… Read about it here: http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20181017-the-goal-towards-which-your-words-adamantly-move   #language, #grammer, #creativewriting, #english, #writing, #punctuation

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Possibilities of moving…

“a boat, even a wrecked and wretched boat still has all the possibilities of moving” ― Dionne Brand, Inventory

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A slice of Summer poetry (Cultural Weekly)…

Check out a review of the poetic arts in America at Cultural Weekly: https://www.culturalweekly.com/slice-summer-poetry/

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21 Books Queer Women (And Everybody Else) Should Read This Pride Month…

Some eye-opening, radical, and unputdownable books about gender, bodies, and identity… Read about them at BuzzFeed.com: 21 Books To Read This Pride Month

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Cultural Weekly – On Gilgamesh…

A review by writer Robert Wood for Cultural Weekly, read it here: https://www.culturalweekly.com/on-gilgamesh/

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‘FMD’ blog history… “100 best novels written in English”…

Originally posted on for much deliberation:
See the following article published on theguardian.com/books for the best 100 novels ever published in English: The 100 best novels written in English

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“The time will come when, with elation, you will greet yourself arriving at your own door, in your own mirror, and each will smile at the other’s welcome.” ~ Derek Walcott…

(from “Sea Grapes”)

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“Only the very weak-minded refuse to be influenced by literature and poetry.” ~ Cassandra Clare…

(from ‘Clockwork Angel’)

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//Cat’s Eye (1988)… 

Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.  ~ Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye (1988) (famous first lines)… 

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//First lines… 

Justice?—You get justice in the next world, in this world you have the law.  ~ William Gaddis, A Frolic of His Own (1994) (famous first lines)… 

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//First line… 

…from Robert Coover, The Origin of the Brunists (1966) Hiram Clegg, together with his wife Emma and four friends of the faith from Randolph Junction, were summoned by the Spirit and Mrs. Clara Collins, widow of the beloved Nazarene preacher Ely Collins, to West Condon on the weekend of the eighteenth and nineteenth of April, […]

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The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.   ~ L. P. Hartley, The Go-Between (1953) (famous first lines)… 

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‘The Napoleon of Notting Hill’… 

The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children’s games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up. ~ G. K. Chesterton, The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904) (famous first lines)… 

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Stephen Crane 1895…

The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting.  ~ Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage (1895) (famous first lines)… 

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